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University of Pittsburgh

Volume 29 Issue 4

Brit scribe accuses U.S. press of vindictiveness, political incest >

October 10th, 1996

Martin Walker, the urbane and ubiquitous British journalist, spoke to a Frick Fine Arts auditorium audience Oct. 7 about adultery, conspiracy, illegal drug use and incest. Walker writes about politics, so those subjects were bound to come up. But he apologized for raising a really offensive topic — journalistic ethics, which Walker regretfully called an […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

NUREMBERG >

October 10th, 1996

Henry King was a small-town mayor in Connecticut who enjoyed discussing political issues at the dinner table. One night in May 1935 he posed this question to his wife and two children: How do you stop war? His family was stumped. After a silence, King proclaimed: "The people don't want wars. It's their leaders who […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

Hamlisch to be honored at UPMC-sponsored event >

October 10th, 1996

Marvin Hamlisch, principal pops conductor for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, will be honored at the 10th anniversary celebration of Competitive Employment Opportunities (CEO) on Oct. 26. Freddie Fu, director of Pitt's Center for Sports Medicine and honorary chair of the event, will present Hamlisch with CEO's first humanitarian award. CEO is a non-profit organization that […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

Painstakingly reproducing Stephen Foster's sketchbook >

October 10th, 1996

Songwriter Stephen Foster's sketchbook is considered one of the most important 19th-century American music manuscripts in existence, according to Deane Root, director of the Stephen Foster Memorial, where the sketchbook is housed. To make it more readily available to those interested in historical material, Root and photographer Jim Burke from the Center for Instructional Development […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

Assembly wants some emphasis on the arts in capital improvement plan >

October 10th, 1996

Faculty Assembly is urging the University Capital Planning Committee to find a place for the arts in the committee's 10-year plan for Pittsburgh campus construction and renovation. As part of the University Senate response to the proposed plan, the Assembly on Oct. 1 unanimously approved the following motion: "Whereas the University has a responsibility to […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

UPMC shifts more patient care from Oakland, greatly expanding number of facilities in other areas >

October 10th, 1996

Of all the changes that have occurred in the health care industry over the past decade, none is more evident from the patient's point of view than the shifting of many services from hospital stays to out-patient care. Driven by the refusal of insurance companies to pay for hospital stays, diagnostic testing and other procedures […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

What's in a name? A lot, according to Pitt psychology prof's research >

October 10th, 1996

Forget all those ABC News, New York Times and CNN polls. If popularity of first names is the criteria, presidential candidates Bill Clinton and Bob Dole are running virtually neck-and-neck, says Herbert Barry, a faculty member in Pitt's psychology department and one of the leading authorities on names. Actually, when it comes to first names […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

Titusville faculty member labors to give local 19th-century women their rightful place in history >

October 10th, 1996

Until recently, it was possible to tour the Drake Well Museum in Titusville and walk out with the impression that women essentially did not exist in northwestern Pennsylvania during the oil boom days of the mid-19th century. As far as could be determined by the museum's exhibits, towns such as Titusville, Oil City and Pithole […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4

Pitt looks for ways to improve quality and diversity of undergrads >

October 10th, 1996

Vice Provost for Academic Affairs Jack L. Daniel is a man with a mission: By mid-way through the spring semester, he plans to inventory all of Pitt's minority student programs; consult with the people who administer those programs; consider the internal and external constraints on recruiting and retaining minority students (especially African-Americans); compare notes with […]

Feature,Volume 29 Issue 4